TAKE THE QUIZ

Yoga for Pelvic Discomfort

mind-body pelvic pain pelvic tension
Yoga for Pelvic Discomfort

I have a special video for you: Yoga for Pelvic Discomfort! This 30-minute routine may be helpful for various types of pelvic discomfort, including Coccydynia, Pudendal Neuralgia, Proctalgia Fugax, Dyspareunia (painful sex) as a result of Vaginismus or Vulvodynia... Or simply a generalized sense of pelvic pain or tension.

How can yoga help pelvic discomfort?

There are many different conditions that can cause pelvic discomfort, but all of them can benefit from a similar exercise/movement approach:

  • Opening up the outer hip, inner thigh (groin area), and pelvic floor muscles.

  • Breathing fully and deeply.

  • Down-regulating the central nervous system via gentle movement and relaxation techniques.

Yoga instead of Kegels!

If you have pelvic discomfort, then please hear this: now is NOT the time for tons of Kegel exercises, booty sculpting moves, or advanced core workouts. Now is the time to let go and relax. Please click the video below to watch Yoga for Pelvic Discomfort. 

*This article (and accompanying video) is not a substitution for individualized medical evaluation and treatment. Stop if anything causes pain or discomfort.

My Experience with Coccydynia

Recently I had an experience with tailbone pain that developed suddenly, and completely out of the blue. This is known as idiopathic coccydynia, and it's a relatively common form of the condition. I truly have NO IDEA why it happened — I didn't experience any type of trauma or injury — but it lasted approximately two weeks, and during that time it was very difficult to sit!

I developed my Yoga for Pelvic Discomfort routine during this time period, and I was lucky enough to experience relief. I'm now symptom-free. I can't guarantee that this routine will work for everyone, but it's definitely worth considering as a starting point.

You can also view my full playlist of YouTube videos for pelvic pain/tension HERE 

BEHIND the Yoga for Discomfort Sequence

The Yoga for Pelvic Discomfort sequence begins with a brief period of breath awareness, bringing attention to the abdomen and pelvic regions and deepening and lengthening the breath. This is not only relaxing, it also begins to release the abdomen and breathing diaphragm.

Next, you'll lengthen the side body (ribs and outer hips), providing more space to breathe, additional release of the breathing diaphragm, and an intro to the hip opening process. Moving on, you'll stretch and mobilize the hips in ways that lengthen the hip flexors and stimulate the ascending and descending colon to regulate digestion.

The latter half of the video calms the sympathetic nervous system, opens the pelvic floor, and stretches the hip adductors (inner thigh muscles).

You'll end with a deeply relaxing duo of final resting poses (legs up the wall pose and Savasana).

I truly hope you enjoy this routine as much as I enjoyed creating it!


 

FINAL NOTES:

My Yoga for Pelvic Discomfort video is not meant to be used as a standalone treatment, but it can be a great ADDITION to your regular medical care. Try it and see if it works for you. If it makes your symptoms feel better, then continue! If it aggravates your symptoms or is uncomfortable in any way, then please STOP. Everyone is different (even people with the same diagnosis), and everyone will respond differently to different treatments.

You know your body best. Listen to what it's telling you!

Want more?

If you love the yoga routine and want MORE, then my Overcome Pelvic Pain program would be perfect for you. Learn more about Overcome right here.

Sending love and light! ~Dr. Bri, PT, DPT 

Does your pelvic floor need help? 

Many women think they just need live with the changes they’re experiencing
“down there,” but this is NOT the case. 
Take the short quiz to find out if you have issues that can be solved naturally. 

TAKE THE QUIZ

The Latest Posts


 

Do You Need to STOP Doing Kegels?

Chronic Pelvic Pain in Females (Masterclass)

Natural and Holistic Remedies for Pelvic Health